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Public Spaces Protection Orders

Public Spaces Protection Orders (PSPOs) are intended to deal with nuisance or antisocial behaviour in a particular area that is detrimental to the local community’s quality of life. The orders impose conditions on the use of that area which apply to everyone so residents, businesses and visitors to the borough can use and enjoy our public spaces and be safe from antisocial behaviour. 

The following Public Spaces Protection Orders are in effect in Norwich:

Dog fouling PSPO (Norwich)

Dog fouling is widely considered to have a negative impact on an area and is unpleasant for residents and visitors. Direct contact with dog faeces can have health implications.

The council provides bins in public areas across the city which can be used by dog owners. If no bins are available, dog owners are encouraged to dispose of the waste at home.

The Order was agreed at Cabinet on 14 April 2021 and came into effect on 26 May 2021 for a period of three years.

Signed Dog fouling PSPO

Area covered by the dog fouling order

The proposed PSPO covers land open to public access across the whole of Norwich.

Map of the area covered by the dog fouling order

How the dog fouling order will be enforced

If a person breaches the PSPO and fails to pick up after their dog, they will be issued with a £100 Fixed Penalty Notice (reduced to £70 if paid within 10 days). The individual will be taken to court if the fine is not paid within 14 days. A person guilty of an offence is liable on summary conviction to a fine up to £1000.

The PSPO will be enforced by authorised officers of Norwich City Council.  

Rules for assistance dogs

There are exemptions to the PSPO for individuals who are registered blind or have a disability which prevents them from clearing up after their assistance dog.

Reporting issues

Report dog fouling issues online

Alcohol control area PSPO (city centre)

The PSPO gives the police and authorised officers of the council powers to confiscate alcohol from people whose excessive drinking causes problems for others in public spaces.

The Order was agreed at Cabinet on 14 April 2021 and came into effect on 26 May 2021 for a period of three years.

Signed Alcohol control area PSPO

Area covered by the alcohol control order

The proposed PSPO covers land open to public access across Norwich city centre.

Map of the area covered by the alcohol control order

How the alcohol control order will be enforced

If the person breaching the PSPO fails to comply with the requirements of the order, they will be issued with a £100 Fixed Penalty Notice (reduced to £70 if paid within 10 days). The individual will be taken to court if the fine is not paid within 14 days. A person guilty of an offence is liable on summary conviction to a fine up to £1000.

The PSPO will be enforced by the Police and authorised officers of Norwich City Council.

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

We’ve pulled together some FAQs about the alcohol control order that we hope will be useful:

What are the concerns and issues with street drinking/drinking in public spaces?
Street drinking is sometimes associated with anti-social behaviour, causing high levels of noise, rowdy and nuisance behaviour, harassment and intimidation of passers-by, as well as the littering of cans and bottles and urination in public spaces.

Can I be stopped or arrested for carrying alcohol in public spaces?
A PSPO does not make it illegal to carry alcohol or to drink alcohol in a public place; as long as drinking is done responsibly, a PSPO will only be used to tackle alcohol related anti-social behaviour or disorder. Under these circumstances police will have the power to stop people drinking alcohol and seize or confiscate alcohol within the controlled area.

Would people still be able to drink or hold alcohol bottles outside pubs?
The PSPO does not make it illegal to drink alcohol in a public place. However, if a person was to drink beyond the legal boundary of a licensed premises and they do not stop drinking if asked to do so by an authorised officer they could be at risk of regulation. A PSPO will only be used to tackle alcohol related antisocial behaviour or disorder.

What about street parties and events in parks?
Events within a public place authorised by a premises license or a Temporary Event Notice (TEN) will be excluded from the Police and authorised council officers PSPO powers.

A PSPO does not make it illegal to carry alcohol or to drink alcohol in a public place; as long as drinking is done responsibly, a PSPO will only be used to tackle alcohol related antisocial behaviour or disorder. Under these circumstances police will have the power to stop people drinking alcohol and seize or confiscate alcohol within the controlled area.

Does the PSPO ban drinking alcohol in public spaces?
It is not an offence to consume alcohol within the PSPO, however; an authorised person can require a person to stop consuming what they believe to be alcohol and require that person to surrender any alcohol or container they believe contains alcohol. The person must be informed that failure to comply with the officers requirement is an offence. The authorised person may dispose of the liquid in anyway way they think is appropriate.